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Black and White Magazine

I’m very gratified to announce that Black and White Magazine has just published portions of my “Deindustrialization Portfolio.” (June 2020 issue)

Earth Day 2020 Online Exhibition

I’m grateful to have been included in “Earth Day 2020” hosted by Gallery Sitka. As mentioned in my previous post, this exhibition was to have opened this week, but things have changed, as we all know.  Art continues however.  This is a mixed media exhibition.  I am a huge fan of photography been shown with other forms of visual art.  Melissa Richards, the curator, has done a great job of curation.   I particularly drawn to her use of color.  You can find the online gallery here.

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Earth Day, 2020, Gallery Sitka

Earth Day rolls around again on April 22 and it is going to be a difficult one.  Like nearly everyone in the world, we’re hunkered down and trying to stay healthy.  It is so heart breaking to hear that so many are unable to achieve what was once such a given.  And of course, it’s always the most vulnerable and the most disadvantaged who seem to be paying the price, along with those from health care to the grocery supply chain.  I am reminded of lessons I’ve learned from a colleague, an environmental scientist, the put this into some kind of larger perspective.  The point of environmentalism isn’t to save the planet.  The planet will survive, albeit perhaps it will evolve. Nature is stronger than the human race.  We need to save ourselves.

In earlier times, what seems like a thousand years, but was really just a month or two ago, I submitted some work for consideration for an Earth Day Exhibition, at Gallery Sitka.  The juror is Melissa Richard, a mixed media artist and educator.  I’m grateful to have been chosen to show in the exhibition, but now of course, the exhibition will be going online.  I’ll pass the url along when I can.   Thanks to Melissa and the folks at Gallery Sitka.  I’ve mentioned this before, but the power of water is awesome (as in inducing a sense of awe, not as in being really really cool).  Perhaps we should pay it more attention.

Erosion, Croatan Sound #1, 2015

Erosion, Croatan Sound #2, 2015

Erosion, Ocean City, New Jersey, 2010

Upcoming Exhibition and the Power of Water

I am honored to share an upcoming exhibition in which I’ll be participating along with two outstanding photographers, Tess Davis and Scarlett Hoey.  The exhibition, Captured Moments, will take open with a reception on Friday, January 17 beginning at 5:30 PM at the Aldrich Heritage Gallery, at Alternatives Whitin Mill, 50 Douglas Road, Whitinsville, MA.  You’ll see an interesting collection of work which I think really speaks to the exhibitions title, Captured Moments, special times or perhaps times with meaning.  You can read more about the Heritage Gallery, the exhibition, and get directions etc. by going here.

I’ll say more about my work below but first I have to give a thanks and shoutout to Alternatives/Open Sky, one of the largest providers of services to the disabled in the region.  They have been working for many years to get beyond the basic challenges of providing services in an effort to develop a truly inclusive community.  Their offshoot, Valleycast, provides cultural and arts programming that brings together those with and without disabilities.

I’ve been been involved with Valleycast for the past year or so and have been witness to what real inclusivity can mean, and how much we can all grow in the process.  Alternatives is also one of the owners of the Whitin Mill, former home of the Whitin Machine Works, once the largest manufacturer of textile manufacturing equipment in the U.S.  They along with other owners and tenants have been working to revitalize this massive beautiful mill that sits along the Mumford River, and they’ve made serious progress.

My own work includes a series of reflections on the power of water.  As you know if you read this blog, I’m a committed environmentalist.  I’ve had the good fortune recently to meet and work with others who share that commitment and have been impressed by their take on the problem.  We’re not trying to “save the planet.”  The planet doesn’t need saving.  It will be just fine, different perhaps, but it is going to be there regardless of how much we screw things up.  We’re really trying to save ourselves.  All you have to do to get a glimpse of the power of nature is look at what nature does with water.

Croatan  Sound  #1, Manteo, 2015

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Croatan Sound #2,  Manteo, 2015

Roanoke Sound, Manteo, 2014

Marsh at Bass Hole, Cape Cod, 2015

The Tarn, Acadia Natioal Park, 2018

Thunder Hole, Acadia National Park, 2018

Deindustrialization Opening

Deindustrialization Invitation for web

If you’re in the Boston area, I want to invite you to the opening of my exhibition, “Deindustrialization,” taking place Thursday evening, November 7 from 5 – 7 PM.  The exhibition consists of twelve large scale portraits of textile mills from the Blackstone Valley region of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. There will be an artist talk shortly after 5, mingling, and I believe free food!  The opening will take place on the campus of Babson College, in the Hollister Gallery.  Directions are here.

I want to thank BabsonArts and Associate Director Danielle Krcmar for making this all possible.  This work was sponsored in part through a sabbatical grant from Babson College, for which I’m also most grateful.  The work was printed on metal, an amazing process, by the wonderful folks at Blazing Editions .  Working with them and more specifically Juliette Pascale was a joy.  The results were stunning.

On another note, this exhibition is really a bit less of a celebration and more of a remembrance.  The industrial revolution in the U.S. and indeed around the world, a revolution that is still going on in many places, brought with it a tremendous upsurge in wealth.  At the same time, it brought with it massive sacrifices on the part of those who did the work and the communities in which these mills were built.

The raw materials for the cotton mills prior to the U.S. Civil War were farmed by enslaved workers kidnapped from Africa.  Even after the Civil War the combination of share cropping arrangements and terror enforced by organizations like the KKK imposed the most severe hardships on those involved.  Working conditions in the mills, though not as bad as one would find in England at the time were extremely harsh.   The environmental degradation that occurred because of the mill industrial waste and the repeated damming of the rivers of the Blackstone Valley is still with us today.

At the same time, mill employment helped to create, at least in part, a melting pot, bringing people together from much of the world, into what became in many places a real community.  Some of those communities still exist today as well.  The boom and bust phenomena, a phenomena which continues unabated, is ultimately a harsh developmental path for our society.