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Beautiful Birch Trees

New Hampshire as it turns out is the second most forested state in the U.S., coming in at over 80% forested.  Yes, this figure is down a bit from the peak, due largely to development. Still it remains an impressive resource.  Not surprisingly, the forest there is somewhat different from that in Massachusetts, at least to the eye.  My subject impression is that they’ve got far more birch trees there.  Birch trees make for a most interesting photographic subject, particularly when they are found in a group.  Across the street from the entrance to the Mt. Washington Road (“This car hasn’t climbed Mt. Washington and probably won’t”) is a beautiful stand of birch.  It had rained that day, so an impromptu street cut through the forest.  (Click on the images for a better view.)

The (mostly) white trunks of the trees make for a nice contrast with and framing for the foliage of course.  The trunks aren’t always white, though.  We came upon two older silver trunked birches caressing one another amidst all the white birches.

Brich trees love son.  They live about 70 years and many took root during the reforestation of New Hampshire just after the turn of the last century.  As such, we often see old ones, toward the end of their lives.

There are a variety of ways to try and capture the spiritual feeling of a place.  A birch forest has such nice vertical lines that suggest a multiple exposure, which you see here.  This was ten images with camera movement up just slightly between images. Nikon DSLRs will compile them for you right in camera, a very nice feature.

It would be remiss of me not to report one other observation from this particular forest.  We had a visitor during our efforts.  Not a particularly great shot.  As usual I was prepared for trees when another opportunity happened by, but here he is.

Now all we need is a squirrel.

3 Comments Post a comment
  1. Sandra #

    Wow. How exciting to see a moose. Good catch! Love your birch trees; we admired these in Finland where they are shorter, fatter, and sturdier because they don’t have to contend with our icy winters.

    October 15, 2011
  2. Molly #

    So cool!

    October 15, 2011
  3. Several fine shots, James. The moose may not be a classic, but it works quite well as a moose and in his environment. Looks like a second year bull. The first image is my favorite.

    October 18, 2011

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