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Finger Lakes Waterfalls

I once again had the privilege of spending some time with Tony Sweet, Susan Milestone and a group of very good photographers, this past week, in the Finger Lakes Region of New York.  I can’t give a strong enough endorsement to their workshops.  This time in particular I was still not quite at the top of my game.  Their compassion and support helped me enormously, making it possible to learn a lot, and create some art (and have a bit of fun).  You need a great subject though and for me, an ardent fan of all things water, the subject was waterfalls.  The ability off water to change the earth, overpowering it’s surroundings is impressive and should serve to remind us once again that we screw around with nature at our peril.  Nature is very very patient.  And very powerful.

From Taughannock Falls, Ulysses, NYHunt_160525_DSC3364-Edit-Edit-2

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From Buttermilk Falls, Ithaca, NY

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And finally, from Watkins Glen State Park, in Watkins Glen, NY

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The Pull of History

One of my favorite books of all time was Time and Again, by the great Jack Finney.  The book tells the story of a young man who with a bit of assistance from the government (clandestine of course) was able to engage in time travel.  No equipment required though.  All he had to do was make himself open to the experience.  Time passes but it doesn’t really pass.  It is still there if we know how to relate to it.  The book’s star was residing, at the request of his coconspirators, at Manhattan’s famous Dakota building.   After quite some time trying to figure out how to be open to the experience, and many false starts, he simply woke up one morning, went outside and it was the later 19th century.  He had taken up the past’s invitation to visit.

It  reminded me of what I try to see when visiting a place with the past.  I do wish I could visit it for real (of course, I’m sure I would have no idea how to cope but what fun is it to think about that). Sometimes you can find a door or at least a window to the past, an object, an artifact, a story, a book.  Walking along what was once the Blackstone Canal ins Uxbridge, MA it’s easy to hear history’s rumblings.  In the Blackstone Heritage Corridor Park you’re walking along the towpath after all.  A team of mules pulled the canal boats along the journey from Worcester to Providence.  If it’s quiet, it is easy to ponder what it was like when the towpath was actually in use, in the early 1800’s.  For me, one of the windows into that state of reverie are the intense reflections that can be seen there on a calm day..  They are intense enough to be disorienting and I offer you a small collection here.  I resisted the temptation to turn them upside down.  You’re welcome.

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Northern Valley Art League Show

I wanted to let folks know that I was fortunate enough to have one of my images selected by the Northern Valley Art League in Redding, California for their upcoming International Juried Photography Show.  The juror was Jack Fulton of the San Francisco Art Institute.  Northern Valley Art League is a significant supporter of the arts in northern California.  I’m very grateful for their support.  The image chosen was of the Spillway at the Quabbin Reservoir.

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