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Posts from the ‘Infrared’ Category

Upcoming Exhibition and the Power of Water

I am honored to share an upcoming exhibition in which I’ll be participating along with two outstanding photographers, Tess Davis and Scarlett Hoey.  The exhibition, Captured Moments, will take open with a reception on Friday, January 17 beginning at 5:30 PM at the Aldrich Heritage Gallery, at Alternatives Whitin Mill, 50 Douglas Road, Whitinsville, MA.  You’ll see an interesting collection of work which I think really speaks to the exhibitions title, Captured Moments, special times or perhaps times with meaning.  You can read more about the Heritage Gallery, the exhibition, and get directions etc. by going here.

I’ll say more about my work below but first I have to give a thanks and shoutout to Alternatives/Open Sky, one of the largest providers of services to the disabled in the region.  They have been working for many years to get beyond the basic challenges of providing services in an effort to develop a truly inclusive community.  Their offshoot, Valleycast, provides cultural and arts programming that brings together those with and without disabilities.

I’ve been been involved with Valleycast for the past year or so and have been witness to what real inclusivity can mean, and how much we can all grow in the process.  Alternatives is also one of the owners of the Whitin Mill, former home of the Whitin Machine Works, once the largest manufacturer of textile manufacturing equipment in the U.S.  They along with other owners and tenants have been working to revitalize this massive beautiful mill that sits along the Mumford River, and they’ve made serious progress.

My own work includes a series of reflections on the power of water.  As you know if you read this blog, I’m a committed environmentalist.  I’ve had the good fortune recently to meet and work with others who share that commitment and have been impressed by their take on the problem.  We’re not trying to “save the planet.”  The planet doesn’t need saving.  It will be just fine, different perhaps, but it is going to be there regardless of how much we screw things up.  We’re really trying to save ourselves.  All you have to do to get a glimpse of the power of nature is look at what nature does with water.

Croatan  Sound  #1, Manteo, 2015

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Croatan Sound #2,  Manteo, 2015

Roanoke Sound, Manteo, 2014

Marsh at Bass Hole, Cape Cod, 2015

The Tarn, Acadia Natioal Park, 2018

Thunder Hole, Acadia National Park, 2018

Working with Color Infrared

This is a technical post, which I never do, so apologies in advance.  I’m actually fairly enthusiastic about some recent developments that I wanted to share.  I have never enjoyed my only rather mundane efforts with color infrared images.  They never looked right to me, only somewhat “cooked” in digital photo parlance.  As such, I typically convert them to black and white and sometimes am pleased with the results.  I”ve been working with a new process for the past several months, and actually published a few results on my previous Earth Day blog.  I have continued to experiment and been relatively happy with the results so I thought it might be useful to share a few details.

The story begins with an e-mail from Kolarivision (my new Infrared camera conversion company with which I am quite pleased) regarding a course they were recommending.  Perhaps bored at the time, I thought I’d give it a try.   The name of the course is Creative Light and Infrared.  You can find out the details about the course here.    I’ll stress up front that I am not a paid endorser for this group, F64 Academy, have never met them, nor talked with them, ever.

The course offers an in-depth exploration of the digital infrared post production process, along with several  accompanying and quite useful tools.  If you’ve done any infrared photography, you know that there are a few significant challenges you face in post production, particularly with color.  The biggest one is that the white balance setting you use in the camera likely won’t hold once you bring an image into your average photo editing program.  It goes all red or at least mostly so.  Worse yet, most photo editing programs don’t have enough range in their white balance settings to be able to fix the problem.  Second, if you’re interested in color infrared images it can be most helpful to effect a “channel swap”, coverting the red channel to blue and the blue channel to red.  I’ve known that for years, but like many photographers was never, ever satisfied with the results.  Adding insult to injury, if you get an image to actually work for you, it is hard to replicate it.

The course walks you through the process of creating a Lightroom/Camera Raw profile that you can apply to your images and effect a nice looking white balance.  In addition, the course provides a set of LUTS that layer on top of the correctly balanced image that will offer you various different channel swapped looks, including looks that are fairly photorealistic. Finally, the course ships with an extensive panel of actions for use inside photoshop, as well as detailed instructions for their use.

So enough with the jargon.  These are from my work with mills in the Blackstone River Valley of Central Massachusetts.  The first two are of the Bernat Mill in Uxbridge, Massachusetts.  The mill burned in 2007.  The last is from the Wilkinsonville Mill in Sutton, Massachusetts.  Wilkinson was an associate of Samual Slater, the first builder of mills in the Blackstone Valley.Hunt_190509__DSC0572-Edit-2Hunt_190509__DSC0576-Edit_DSC0802-Edit-2

This is still a work in process as you can see, but my interest hasn’t flagged so far.  One of the most interesting aspects of photographic work is the almost never ending opportunities for learning that you can stumble across.  Courses like this aren’t cheap, and some are duds.  This one was helpful.  Of course, YMMV.