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Posts from the ‘Massachsetts’ Category

Earth Day and the March for Science

Congressman Jim McGovern and colleagues did a nice job of nurturing hope and resistance at today’s March for Science held in Elm Park, Worcester, Massachusetts.  I have studiously tried to avoid launching into rants on this blog in recent years, largely on doctor’s orders.  But, as McGovern said, and I have to paraphrase rather than quote, if you asked me twenty years ago if I would have to help stage a march in favor of science some day, I’d say, ‘what are you, nuts?’  But here we are.Hunt_170422_1004176It is worth reminding ourselves that the E.P.A. was created during the Nixon Presidency. You remember Nixon, the well loved republican.  Oh, wait….  Even that guy, expletive deleted that he was, couldn’t hold a candle to our current expletive deleted.  Trump’s efforts to lower the collective IQ and fire up the coal industry have left me feeling a sense of deja vu and I have finally figured out why.  He’s building up an industry for which there is little or no market.  It reminds me of the golden days of the U.S.S.R., which is probably no coincidence.  In that centrally planned economy, they would crank out concrete that wasn’t ever going to be shipped anywhere.  No customers.  So we mine coal and further screw up an already vulnerable planet while the UK celebrates their first day of using no coal, anywhere, for anything.  I would not call the UK a bastion of liberal thought.  Perhaps they just know how to do business.  But, here we are.

It was encouraging to join the assembly today.  The weather was dreadful.  There is a far bigger march taking place in Boston.  No matter.  Sometimes you just need to rant.  Sorry doc.Hunt_170422_1004177

 

In the Bleak Midwinter

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This past year was quite difficult for many.  This coming year looks a bit shaky. There is quite a bit to hope for, and also much to pray about.  Good luck to us all.

“In the Bleak Midwinter” is a Christmas Carol written by Christina Rossetti in the mid-19th century.  It is a song about survival.  These images are from Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary in Natick, MA, USA.

Herons Along the Blackstone River

It is very hard if you’re out in nature in New England on a routine basis to not develop a fascination with herons. These wonderfully large and patient birds are actually quite easy to photograph. Working stiffs, they only get annoyed with you if you get so close that you screw with their fishing. Can’t say that I blame them. Their markings and scars give each bird a distinctive purpose. For whatever reason, it has been a great year for heron along the Blackstone River. I thought I share a few environmental and reflective portraits as the season wanes.

hunt_160620_1120624-edit-editBlackstone River Heritage Park, Upton, Massachusetts

hunt_160815_1020843-edit-edithunt_160831_1130459-edit-edithunt_160831_1130468-edit-editBlackstone Valley Bicycle Path, Millbury, Massachusetts

hunt_160814_dsc4192-edithunt_160814_dsc4216-edit-editWoonsocket Falls, Woonsocket, Rhode Island

hunt_160831_1130586-edit-editBlackstone Valley Bicycle Path, Millbury, Massachusetts

Contemplating the Water

Last week I posted a series of images of the water flow at the South Natick Dam, along the Charles in Natick, Massachusetts.  Using long exposure techniques I’ve enjoyed studying the way the water flows around its various obstructions.  My interest in the water, and enjoyment of being at the water is hardly new or unique of course.  The flow of water has been providing sustenance and soothing to humanity for as long as we’ve been here (though it doesn’t seem to help us much in weeks like this one).  Focus on water is of course also not unique to humans.  I was reminded of this recently while continuing to photograph here.

Hunt_160705170703 - S. Natick - 7-Edit

Hunt_160709170703 - S. Natick - 26 Pan F-Edit

Hunt_160709170703 - S. Natick - 31 Pan F-Edit

Of course this fellow does it for a living.  Note that these are long exposures.  But he’s not moving. Those who photograph wildlife routinely will generally confirm that wild animals never actually stand still.  They may be quite, but not still.  He’s staring at the water and continued to do so for a good 20 minutes.  He then changed positions and continued his focused attention.  A young couple nearby struck up a conversation and reminded me that he’s doing that because he has to.  We listen to the water because we like it.  How did it all start?  We’ll see this fellow again soon.

Technical note:  These images were shot on film, TMAX 100 and Pan F 50.  Both are wonderful films, still available.  There is very  little grain visible except under a magnifying glass.  I sometimes shoot with film just to make me think about things in a more contemplative fashion.  I found it most helpful here.

Northern Valley Art League Show

I wanted to let folks know that I was fortunate enough to have one of my images selected by the Northern Valley Art League in Redding, California for their upcoming International Juried Photography Show.  The juror was Jack Fulton of the San Francisco Art Institute.  Northern Valley Art League is a significant supporter of the arts in northern California.  I’m very grateful for their support.  The image chosen was of the Spillway at the Quabbin Reservoir.

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