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Posts from the ‘Sustainability’ Category

Blackstone Heritage Corridor NPS Calendar

I’m honored to have had two images chosen by the Blackstone Heritage Corridor and National Park Service for inclusion in their 2018 Calendar.  Both are from the River Bend Farm National Heritage Corridor in Uxbridge, Massachusetts.  I’ve mentioned this location before.  This portion of the National Heritage Corridor explores the Blackstone Canal, which was constructed in 1827-28 running from Worcester, Massachusetts to Providence, Rhode Island.  The Canal was open for only two decades and was considered a business failure.  Inspired by the success of the Erie Canal in New York, the Blackstone Canal was to provide relatively inexpensive and fairly rapid transportation along this developing corridor.  It’s history turned out to be torturous as it was initially thought to be a boon for the growing cotton mill industry along the Blackstone River.  Soon however, the Mill owners were suing the Canal owners over the use of water from the River.  This on the heels of the conflicts between the areas farmers and industrialists over water use.

This section of the Canal has been restored.  The tow path runs along the Canal and was used by Ox and Mules to power the boats that navigated the canal.  For July:

Blackstone Canal and Towpath in Spring -  2016

Both of these images show an unusually wide portion of the Canal which was for the most part extremely narrow.  For November:

Dock along the Blacksstone Canal in Fall - 2016

The work of the National Park Service as well as the states of Rhode Island and Massachusetts here in the Blackstone Corridor helps us to try and grapple with the very complex intersections between the natural environment, entrepreneurship, social policy and social justice that took place and still are in play in the Corridor. As I’ve pointed out, the Blackstone River was one of the Rivers that actually provoked the Clean Water Act, signed by that noted environmentalist, Richard Nixon…(hey, he signed it, so good for him).  The lessons from the Corridor are lessons that evolve over hundreds of years.  It is not easy for us to understand those lessons for that very reason, but by holding the discussion, we can perhaps make progress.

Yesterday, we had the pleasure of attending the second annual Biodiversity Festival hosted by the Corridor, in Lincoln, Rhode Island.  It was inspiring to see so many people, including our wonderful daughter Molly, who are engaged in trying to protect our environment.  Molly works at the Northern Rhode Island Conservation District. These folks engage in a wide variety of environmental and educational activities with the goal of protecting the drinking water for a large number of Rhode Island citizens.  Drinking water….kind of important I think.  One lesson is clear:  protect that which is essential to our lives.

 

Earth Day and the March for Science

Congressman Jim McGovern and colleagues did a nice job of nurturing hope and resistance at today’s March for Science held in Elm Park, Worcester, Massachusetts.  I have studiously tried to avoid launching into rants on this blog in recent years, largely on doctor’s orders.  But, as McGovern said, and I have to paraphrase rather than quote, if you asked me twenty years ago if I would have to help stage a march in favor of science some day, I’d say, ‘what are you, nuts?’  But here we are.Hunt_170422_1004176It is worth reminding ourselves that the E.P.A. was created during the Nixon Presidency. You remember Nixon, the well loved republican.  Oh, wait….  Even that guy, expletive deleted that he was, couldn’t hold a candle to our current expletive deleted.  Trump’s efforts to lower the collective IQ and fire up the coal industry have left me feeling a sense of deja vu and I have finally figured out why.  He’s building up an industry for which there is little or no market.  It reminds me of the golden days of the U.S.S.R., which is probably no coincidence.  In that centrally planned economy, they would crank out concrete that wasn’t ever going to be shipped anywhere.  No customers.  So we mine coal and further screw up an already vulnerable planet while the UK celebrates their first day of using no coal, anywhere, for anything.  I would not call the UK a bastion of liberal thought.  Perhaps they just know how to do business.  But, here we are.

It was encouraging to join the assembly today.  The weather was dreadful.  There is a far bigger march taking place in Boston.  No matter.  Sometimes you just need to rant.  Sorry doc.Hunt_170422_1004177

 

Photoessay: The Blackstone River and Route 146

I’ve mentioned here that my current project focus is on the Blackstone River.  For those who don’t know, the Blackstone flows from Worcester, Massachusetts to Providence, Rhode Island.  It’s strategic importance as a source of power led to rather extreme levels of both entrepreneurship and exploitation spanning nearly two hundred years.  It remains in content with humanity even as interest in its natural potential grows.  That tension is most acutely visible, to me at least, along a two mile stretch of the river in Millbury and Worcester, Massachusetts. There the River contents with a super highway and a very active freight railroad line.  Being in the city, it also contends with city life and the best and worst that the city existence has to offer.  Here’s a portfolio of images from my travels there over the past year.

James Hunt_Blackstone River Portfolio 1_2016_01James Hunt_Blackstone River Portfolio 1_2016_02James Hunt_Blackstone River Portfolio 1_2016_03James Hunt_Blackstone River Portfolio 1_2016_04James Hunt_Blackstone River Portfolio 1_2016_05James Hunt_Blackstone River Portfolio 1_2016_06James Hunt_Blackstone River Portfolio 1_2016_07James Hunt_Blackstone River Portfolio 1_2016_08James Hunt_Blackstone River Portfolio 1_2016_09James Hunt_Blackstone River Portfolio 1_2016_10James Hunt_Blackstone River Portfolio 1_2016_11James Hunt_Blackstone River Portfolio 1_2016_12James Hunt_Blackstone River Portfolio 1_2016_13James Hunt_Blackstone River Portfolio 1_2016_14James Hunt_Blackstone River Portfolio 1_2016_15

Guest Blog on Landscape Photography Blogger

I wanted to pass along that I’ve had the honor of having been asked by David Leland Hyde to do a guest blog about the Quabbin Reservoir on his site, Landscape Photography Blogger.  If you’re interested, just click on the hot link associated with the name.  David is a terrific photographer in his own right, but really came into the field in part as a steward to the library of work of his Father, Philip Hyde.  Philip Hyde, who passed away in 2006, left behind a body of work easily on a par with that of the other great names of landscape photography such as Ansel Adams and Elliot Porter.  He created magnificent art that stood on its own for its ability to capture something of the spirit of place in the west.  In addition though, his art was also in the service of education and conservation.  He was closely aligned with the Sierra Club among other groups in that effort and perhaps best known for his work in the area behind Glen Canyon Dam in Colorado, locations now submerged by the Reservoir there.  He was a relentless defender of the natural world in part because he felt that the experience of participating in that world was essential for all of us.  As a photographer he was also one of the first large landscape photographers to use color film.  Now we take color for granted, and hardly ever use film!  At the time, that was a major technological leap. David Leland Hyde has I think invigorated Phillip Hyde’s legacy, as both an artist and an environmentalist, in a way that is so important.  This story goes on, thankfully.

I was thrilled then when David contacted me and expressed a real interest in our Massachusetts wilderness, the Quabbin Reservoir area.  As my wife and I joke sometimes, it’s not Yosemite, but it’s pretty darn interesting.  As I tried to capture in the piece on Landscape Photography Blogger, anyone who cares to go there can experience that sense of being in the wild that Philip Hyde rightfully drew to our attention.  Thanks to David for helping spread that story.

A while back, I posted the video you see below that presents some of Philip Hyde’s work.  I titled the post, Images that Changed the World.  Have a look.  The imagery is stunning.  David Leland Hyde is the narrator.  And yes, Philip and his colleagues had to fight to keep dams out of the Grand Canyon, if you can believe that. It seems to me that we have come a long way, but that alas, we have a long way to go. Those of you reading this blog who are interested in landscape photography should make a visit to Landscape Photography Blogger a routine part of your week.  It’s always worth the time.

Happy July 4th at Elm Park

Happy July Fourth to those from the United States.  It’s a day to relax but also remember.  I wanted to take this occasion to provide a brief update on one of my most memorable places, Elm Park in downtown Worcester, Massachusetts.  It is one of the oldest Park’s in the United States. I’ve blogged about the park many times, most recently about the experience of being forgotten there, as illustrated by the state of some of the more contemplative locations at the Park.  It made for interesting photography but poor park upkeep.  Then, low and behold, in the middle of that project, the City, State and Feds came to the rescue and began a significant restoration of the park.  I’ve continued to photograph the changing nature of Elm Park as the reconstruction, in the north-east corner at this point, continues.  I have to admit, it has taken some getting used to.  I had grown quite fond of the shabbiness of the old dowager, but that won’t make for a viable and livable inner city.

The process has created a number of interesting visual opportunities, in and of itself.  Rebuilding is co-existing with on-going use of the Park where that can be done safely.  (Click on the images for a better view.)

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There are significant signs of progress.

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Those familiar with the Park will know this scene.  The stones along the shoreline are new.  Children used to feed geese on the sand here, there was no clearly demarcation of the Pond.  That may seem kind of nice and wonderful on the surface except it’s bad for the geese and the Park.  It always used to bug me that such behavior would take place right under a big sign that says “Feeding Wildlife is Harmful to the Wildlife and the Park.”  But I digress.  The construction has also provided an opportunity to see the detail that goes into making a park work.  Did you ever wonder why all those trash cans are never stolen?  Here’s the reason…

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That is one big base.  Invest in trashcan stability in major urban parks.  You cannot go wrong.  The lighting is also changing.  Previously, there had been rather attractive lighting in the Park.  It was sparse and rarely turned on.  Now lights are being added throughout.  With the exception of some very tall structures around the north pond, most will I think fit right in with the history of the park.  Some are up now, but not turned on yet and as such, not particularly good photographic subjects.  This will give you an idea, however.

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So the work continues and I’ll try to provide more imagery in the future.  It is difficult to document a project like this with a fine art eye.  It may be that only the final product will do justice to the intangible experience of the Park, an experience that those of us who love it will always value.

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It is so easy to think that “common” areas such as parks have no place in our individualized society. It’s also easy to dis the government for nearly everything.  These commons, such as Elm Park though provide the touch points for a society.  That remains as important as it always has been.  So thanks to those who are maintaining this particular touch point.