Skip to content

Posts from the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Facebook Friend Fraud

You have to love social media.  Evidently someone created an account on Facebook under the name “James Hunt” and is now spreading around Friend requests.  At least some of those are going to existing Facebook friends.  Supposedly Facebook has taken that profile down.  You can tell if something on Facebook is real because you’ll see my picture (whether you want to or not is another question).  The fraudulent profile just has a blank face attached.  Apologies for any inconvenience.

Acadia

We haven’t had a particularly pretty foliage season in Central Massachusetts.  Not to my eyes at least.  Luckily, we had an opportunity to spend a few days further north in Acadia National Park, Mount Desert Island, Maine.  They were not so unfortunate!  I don’t know that I’ve ever seen such intense color, so of course I spent a good deal of time working in black and white.  We were with Tony Sweet and Susan Milestone and a bunch of very nice and quite talented workshop participants.  I always learn a lot from them, probably because of their depth of preparation, their knowledge and their positive attitude.  Tony has an ability to articulate the creative process and rationale that I always find inspiring.  He has a wonderful way of validating the imagination, something I need a dose of every so often.  I recommend them highly if you’re looking for a workshop experience.  You won’t be disappointed.

But, no thousand words today though, on with the pictures.  (And I swear, I did not touch the saturation slider on these.  You get up early in the morning and shoot late into the evening with Tony.  Mother nature is the one manipulating the colors at those hours, but that’s sort of her job so…)

From Eagle Lake at sunriseHunt_181013__DSC0812-Edit

Along Duck Creek Road

Hunt_181012__DSC3636

Hunt_181012__DSC3428-Edit

Hunt_181012__DSC3413

Hunt_181011__DSC3270

Hunt_181012__DSC3628

Boulder Beach at Sunrise, in the rain

Hunt_181011__DSC3232-Edit

Hunt_181011__DSC3257-Edit

From Thunder Hole (It really does sound like Thunder)

Hunt_181012__DSC3297-Edit

Hunt_181012__DSC3310-Edit

Hunt_181012__DSC3332-Edit

From Cadillac Mountain

Hunt_181012__DSC0650-EditHunt_181012__DSC3688Hunt_181012__DSC0790-HDR

Acadia National Park is about six hours north from our home.  I can’t believe it took us this long to get there.  It is a big Park, and I would recommend either going with a guide, or doing some serious research before hand, during the day time!

Tech Note:  I hate writing about gear because it’s basically irrelevant at this point.  But a number of these images were taken with the Nikon Z7, Nikon’s new entry into the mirrorless market place.  For whatever reason, none good, it seems to draw a fair amount of criticism on the good old internet, particularly from those who have never used it.  It seems to be a tribal thing, or a way for “influencers” to generate click bait.  It’s sad that all you have to do these days is make something up and it becomes fact.

I thought the camera performed exceptionally well.  I’ll be using it a lot for video as I have grown very tired of taking along a second system.  The still image quality, video quality, still and video autofocus, all worked beyond my expectations.  And we really did land on the moon in 1969.

“Under the Highway” Exhibition in Worcester

Falls Under the Highway, Blackstone River - 2015

EXHIBITION OPENING AT THE FRANKLIN SQUARE GALLERY, HANOVER THEATER, JUNE 27, 6 – 8PM.  ARTIST TALK AT 6:15.  REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED!

I’m happy to report that an exhibition of my work from the Blackstone River will be opening at the Franklin Square Gallery at the Hanover Theater in Worcester, Massachusetts on June 27.  The exhibition is produced by ArtsWorcester and I’m eternally grateful for this opportunity.

The exhibition works were taken along the Blackstone River Bikeway, in Millbury and Worcester, Massachusetts.  The Bikeway, which is an even better walking trail, was created during Worcester’s “Little Dig,” i.e. the reconstruction of Route 146, around 2000.  I have been fascinated by the anxious beauty there since I first explored the Path in 2013.  One can see the interaction of the River, the highway and the railroad, and society in the context of an urban park.

What the River Sees, Blackstone River- 2016

The River is both beautiful and long suffering.  The bikeway was created as part of an effort to celebrate and restore the River through the establishment of the Blackstone Valley National Heritage Corridor.  The Blackstone has enormous historical significance as the engine of entrepreneurship in the new United States in the late 1700’s.  Enormous wealth was created, thousands were employed, but the River was taken for granted.  As I’ve described here previously, the River became one of the most polluted rivers in the country.  Now, many folks are trying to help the River and the surrounding areas, but it’s tough going.  I hope the exhibition contributes to raising awareness of the hidden beauty of the River even in this seemingly hostile environment, celebrating the work that’s gone into trying to help the River and at the same time demonstrating the ever present possibility that we could take our environment for granted at any moment.

Railroad Bridge, Diversion Canal - 2015

Recovery

The U.S. Clean Water Act was inspired in part by the Blackstone River, which runs from Worcester, Massachusetts to Providence, Rhode Island.  It was really the home of the industrial revolution in the U.S. because of the 500 foot drop in the River’s elevation between Worcester and Providence.  It was dammed no less than 49 times along the way, to create water wheels and power for the many, many mills that began to populate the region in the early 1800’s. That was a long time ago of course and the mills have largely disappeared, chasing cheaper labor first to the south, and then globally. Meanwhile, the River, which was once known as the hardest working river in the U.S. became known as the most polluted.  Keep in mind that the Clean Water Act was signed into law by a Republican President.  There were other equally polluted rivers of course, but the Blackstone was up there.

Things can change.  Out in the River, “rebranded” the Seekonk River at this location for some reason, just south of Pawtucket, Rhode Island, with the RiverTours Blackstone (highly recommended by the way, hit the link if you’re interested) we could see evidence of the change all around us……fish and lots of them.  Hard to see at first because of the sand stirred up by the boat, and the fact that I didn’t have a polarizing lens with me to cut down the glare in the water, but they were there.

_1000425

_1000433

_1000428

_1000430

Their relative invisibility however, was also defensively useful.  They were far from alone.  The bird activity was intense and impressive.  I’m not a bird photographer, but though I’d share a few examples.

_1000294

_1000543

_1000243-Edit

The fish now face the challengers that they have always faced, as it should be (I’d include fishermen and women on that list as well, but not yet.  You’re not supposed to eat fish from the River, yet.)

_1000591

_1000619

_1000990

During these extraordinarily difficult times I think it’s very important to keep in mind a few successes. We can make things better, if we care to.  The Blackstone River is getting cleaner.

On Exhibit at the Providence Center for Photographic Arts

I’m pleased to announce that one of my “Holding Back the Water – Quabbin Reservoir” images has been chosen for inclusion in the Providence Center for Photographic Arts upcoming Exhibition, “Unseen Photography Beyond the Visible.”  The Exhibition features work from the infrared and ultraviolet ends of the visual spectrum, revealing structure, shape and light that we don’t normally see.  I was drawn to this kind of photography particularly in my efforts to understand the interaction between the great dam and dike that hold back the waters of the Quabbin Reservoir, and the New England countryside.  Engineering melds into foothills, and beyond.  This is the spillway through which overflow water from the Reservoir flows.  You’ll note that there wasn’t much flowing when this image was created, and there still isn’t much flowing now.  The level of water in the Reservoir is higher, but still not at 100%.  We will have to learn to live with more uncertainty about what keeps us alive, particularly in the current political, dare I say, climate.  There will be a opening reception at the on April 20 from 5 – 9 PM.  You can get directions from their web site, by clicking the link above.  Thank you.

Spillway Lookout - 2

View of the lookout from the north, dry spillway below