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Posts from the ‘urban nature’ Category

Upcoming Publication: Black and White Magazine

I’m grateful to be able to announce a soon to be published portfolio in Black and White Magazine.  My work “Lost in the Water” was chosen for a portfolio merit award and will be published this summer.  For those who don’t know how such things work, in a portfolio competition, you submit one or more portfolios of as many images as the publication requests, grouped around a particular theme.  The interesting question for me has to do with what the editors actually end up choosing to publish.  It is almost never would I expect, reminding me once again just how subjective art really is.  But no matter, as I said, I’m grateful.  Here is my selection of a four favorites from the submission.

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These are from a location that has become very special to me, the South Natick, Massachusetts Dam along the Charles River.  I was able to work there even though I was pretty ill at the time.  The River helped me a great deal and I’m also very grateful for that assistance as well.

If you want to see what the editors chose, you can find their take in Black and White Magazine (the U.S. publication), Issue 177, August 2017.  Alas, photography magazines can be hard to find but Barnes and Noble is probably a good bet.

Work on Exhibit at the Griffin Museum of Photography

I’m again participating in the Atelier Exhibition at the Griffin Museum of Photography.

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Atelier 25 opens tonight and runs through March 31.  I want to thank Meg Birnbaum and Amy Amy Rindskopf for leading the exhibition.  My work is from the “Lost in the Water Project.”

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Winter in the Forest

It isn’t over yet.

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Let us hope that spring arrives soon, when it is supposed to arrive.

Herons Along the Blackstone River

It is very hard if you’re out in nature in New England on a routine basis to not develop a fascination with herons. These wonderfully large and patient birds are actually quite easy to photograph. Working stiffs, they only get annoyed with you if you get so close that you screw with their fishing. Can’t say that I blame them. Their markings and scars give each bird a distinctive purpose. For whatever reason, it has been a great year for heron along the Blackstone River. I thought I share a few environmental and reflective portraits as the season wanes.

hunt_160620_1120624-edit-editBlackstone River Heritage Park, Upton, Massachusetts

hunt_160815_1020843-edit-edithunt_160831_1130459-edit-edithunt_160831_1130468-edit-editBlackstone Valley Bicycle Path, Millbury, Massachusetts

hunt_160814_dsc4192-edithunt_160814_dsc4216-edit-editWoonsocket Falls, Woonsocket, Rhode Island

hunt_160831_1130586-edit-editBlackstone Valley Bicycle Path, Millbury, Massachusetts

Contemplating the Water

Last week I posted a series of images of the water flow at the South Natick Dam, along the Charles in Natick, Massachusetts.  Using long exposure techniques I’ve enjoyed studying the way the water flows around its various obstructions.  My interest in the water, and enjoyment of being at the water is hardly new or unique of course.  The flow of water has been providing sustenance and soothing to humanity for as long as we’ve been here (though it doesn’t seem to help us much in weeks like this one).  Focus on water is of course also not unique to humans.  I was reminded of this recently while continuing to photograph here.

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Of course this fellow does it for a living.  Note that these are long exposures.  But he’s not moving. Those who photograph wildlife routinely will generally confirm that wild animals never actually stand still.  They may be quite, but not still.  He’s staring at the water and continued to do so for a good 20 minutes.  He then changed positions and continued his focused attention.  A young couple nearby struck up a conversation and reminded me that he’s doing that because he has to.  We listen to the water because we like it.  How did it all start?  We’ll see this fellow again soon.

Technical note:  These images were shot on film, TMAX 100 and Pan F 50.  Both are wonderful films, still available.  There is very  little grain visible except under a magnifying glass.  I sometimes shoot with film just to make me think about things in a more contemplative fashion.  I found it most helpful here.