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Blackstone Heritage Corridor NPS Calendar

I’m honored to have had two images chosen by the Blackstone Heritage Corridor and National Park Service for inclusion in their 2018 Calendar.  Both are from the River Bend Farm National Heritage Corridor in Uxbridge, Massachusetts.  I’ve mentioned this location before.  This portion of the National Heritage Corridor explores the Blackstone Canal, which was constructed in 1827-28 running from Worcester, Massachusetts to Providence, Rhode Island.  The Canal was open for only two decades and was considered a business failure.  Inspired by the success of the Erie Canal in New York, the Blackstone Canal was to provide relatively inexpensive and fairly rapid transportation along this developing corridor.  It’s history turned out to be torturous as it was initially thought to be a boon for the growing cotton mill industry along the Blackstone River.  Soon however, the Mill owners were suing the Canal owners over the use of water from the River.  This on the heels of the conflicts between the areas farmers and industrialists over water use.

This section of the Canal has been restored.  The tow path runs along the Canal and was used by Ox and Mules to power the boats that navigated the canal.  For July:

Blackstone Canal and Towpath in Spring -  2016

Both of these images show an unusually wide portion of the Canal which was for the most part extremely narrow.  For November:

Dock along the Blacksstone Canal in Fall - 2016

The work of the National Park Service as well as the states of Rhode Island and Massachusetts here in the Blackstone Corridor helps us to try and grapple with the very complex intersections between the natural environment, entrepreneurship, social policy and social justice that took place and still are in play in the Corridor. As I’ve pointed out, the Blackstone River was one of the Rivers that actually provoked the Clean Water Act, signed by that noted environmentalist, Richard Nixon…(hey, he signed it, so good for him).  The lessons from the Corridor are lessons that evolve over hundreds of years.  It is not easy for us to understand those lessons for that very reason, but by holding the discussion, we can perhaps make progress.

Yesterday, we had the pleasure of attending the second annual Biodiversity Festival hosted by the Corridor, in Lincoln, Rhode Island.  It was inspiring to see so many people, including our wonderful daughter Molly, who are engaged in trying to protect our environment.  Molly works at the Northern Rhode Island Conservation District. These folks engage in a wide variety of environmental and educational activities with the goal of protecting the drinking water for a large number of Rhode Island citizens.  Drinking water….kind of important I think.  One lesson is clear:  protect that which is essential to our lives.

 

Recovery

The U.S. Clean Water Act was inspired in part by the Blackstone River, which runs from Worcester, Massachusetts to Providence, Rhode Island.  It was really the home of the industrial revolution in the U.S. because of the 500 foot drop in the River’s elevation between Worcester and Providence.  It was dammed no less than 49 times along the way, to create water wheels and power for the many, many mills that began to populate the region in the early 1800’s. That was a long time ago of course and the mills have largely disappeared, chasing cheaper labor first to the south, and then globally. Meanwhile, the River, which was once known as the hardest working river in the U.S. became known as the most polluted.  Keep in mind that the Clean Water Act was signed into law by a Republican President.  There were other equally polluted rivers of course, but the Blackstone was up there.

Things can change.  Out in the River, “rebranded” the Seekonk River at this location for some reason, just south of Pawtucket, Rhode Island, with the RiverTours Blackstone (highly recommended by the way, hit the link if you’re interested) we could see evidence of the change all around us……fish and lots of them.  Hard to see at first because of the sand stirred up by the boat, and the fact that I didn’t have a polarizing lens with me to cut down the glare in the water, but they were there.

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Their relative invisibility however, was also defensively useful.  They were far from alone.  The bird activity was intense and impressive.  I’m not a bird photographer, but though I’d share a few examples.

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The fish now face the challengers that they have always faced, as it should be (I’d include fishermen and women on that list as well, but not yet.  You’re not supposed to eat fish from the River, yet.)

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During these extraordinarily difficult times I think it’s very important to keep in mind a few successes. We can make things better, if we care to.  The Blackstone River is getting cleaner.

Erosion – A Downloadable PDF

Over this past six months I’ve been exploring a variety of ways of getting imagery out there in product form in a fashion that represents some of my thinking, beyond the single image.  The first of these presents a series of images from the east coast of the U.S. on a topic soon to be of importance to everyone, the rising seas.

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Click on the link here to download a pdf.  You can view the pdf on either a tablet or a computer.  Alas, the navigation buttons work only on a computer.  However, on a tablet, you can just swipe.  These images are also available as a folio with images and colophon, printed on archival matte paper, 8.5″ X 11″,  boxed for $60.00.  Contact me at james@jameshuntphotography.com for more information.  Thanks.

Resist

Like many, I’ve spent considerable time reacting to the thoughtlessness with which our elected officials in Washington ignore the truth.  Most recently, we were told by our Secretary of Energy that carbon dioxide has nothing to do with the warming of the planet, which is fine because he also feels the planet isn’t warming.  But of course it is. The growing season is longer, ice out is earlier and far worse things are happening to places like Tangier Island in the Chesapeake Bay (it is disappearing) and all over the world.  Carbon dioxide and methane are the two gases in our atmosphere responsible for the warming of the planet.  That is not a particularly controversial scientific statement. I could go on and on but the bottom line is that the assault on reality seems overwhelming. What does it mean to “resist” that assault?

I have always experienced the power of nature as inevitable which explains my interest in erosion among other things. On a recent trip to Portsmouth, New Hampshire, thanks to the advice of a friend, we drove along Ocean Blvd., Rt 1-A, new Odiorne Point State Park.  New Englanders are pretty used to two kinds of coastlines:  sandy beaches and granite.  This beautiful stretch of highway has both, in the same location.  You can see eroding sand, and massive granite formations touching one another.  That granite isn’t going anywhere.  Sure, granite can be moved, by glaciers.  Anybody, other than the Secretary of Energy expect to see one of those in these parts anytime soon?  Probably not.  It will indeed erode over very very long periods of time, but so slowly, the water doesn’t represent a tremendous threat.  It faces into the sea and the wind, regardless.

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I remember once hearing Pete Seeger talk about resistance.  He was reflecting on all of the painful times and threats he had witnessed over the course of his life.  He didn’t seem to be the least bit deterred by the persistent nature of the forces with which he was engaged.  He also didn’t seem fearful or likely to succumb to hopelessness.  “We shall not be moved.” (based on the Biblical text, Jeremiah 17:8-9.)   Perhaps we expect it to be easy.

 

Upcoming Publication: Black and White Magazine

I’m grateful to be able to announce a soon to be published portfolio in Black and White Magazine.  My work “Lost in the Water” was chosen for a portfolio merit award and will be published this summer.  For those who don’t know how such things work, in a portfolio competition, you submit one or more portfolios of as many images as the publication requests, grouped around a particular theme.  The interesting question for me has to do with what the editors actually end up choosing to publish.  It is almost never would I expect, reminding me once again just how subjective art really is.  But no matter, as I said, I’m grateful.  Here is my selection of a four favorites from the submission.

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These are from a location that has become very special to me, the South Natick, Massachusetts Dam along the Charles River.  I was able to work there even though I was pretty ill at the time.  The River helped me a great deal and I’m also very grateful for that assistance as well.

If you want to see what the editors chose, you can find their take in Black and White Magazine (the U.S. publication), Issue 177, August 2017.  Alas, photography magazines can be hard to find but Barnes and Noble is probably a good bet.