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Posts tagged ‘Black and White’

Lost in the Water Exhibition at the Art and Frame Emporium

Lost in the Water #1, 2016

I want to thank my friends at the Art and Frame Emporium in Westborough, Massachusetts for hosting a small exhibition of my series, “Lost in the Water” through November 8.  You’ll also be able to check out a very affordable folio of images from the show.  If you need direction, hit the link above.

Resist

Like many, I’ve spent considerable time reacting to the thoughtlessness with which our elected officials in Washington ignore the truth.  Most recently, we were told by our Secretary of Energy that carbon dioxide has nothing to do with the warming of the planet, which is fine because he also feels the planet isn’t warming.  But of course it is. The growing season is longer, ice out is earlier and far worse things are happening to places like Tangier Island in the Chesapeake Bay (it is disappearing) and all over the world.  Carbon dioxide and methane are the two gases in our atmosphere responsible for the warming of the planet.  That is not a particularly controversial scientific statement. I could go on and on but the bottom line is that the assault on reality seems overwhelming. What does it mean to “resist” that assault?

I have always experienced the power of nature as inevitable which explains my interest in erosion among other things. On a recent trip to Portsmouth, New Hampshire, thanks to the advice of a friend, we drove along Ocean Blvd., Rt 1-A, new Odiorne Point State Park.  New Englanders are pretty used to two kinds of coastlines:  sandy beaches and granite.  This beautiful stretch of highway has both, in the same location.  You can see eroding sand, and massive granite formations touching one another.  That granite isn’t going anywhere.  Sure, granite can be moved, by glaciers.  Anybody, other than the Secretary of Energy expect to see one of those in these parts anytime soon?  Probably not.  It will indeed erode over very very long periods of time, but so slowly, the water doesn’t represent a tremendous threat.  It faces into the sea and the wind, regardless.

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I remember once hearing Pete Seeger talk about resistance.  He was reflecting on all of the painful times and threats he had witnessed over the course of his life.  He didn’t seem to be the least bit deterred by the persistent nature of the forces with which he was engaged.  He also didn’t seem fearful or likely to succumb to hopelessness.  “We shall not be moved.” (based on the Biblical text, Jeremiah 17:8-9.)   Perhaps we expect it to be easy.

 

Work on Exhibit at the Griffin Museum of Photography

I’m again participating in the Atelier Exhibition at the Griffin Museum of Photography.

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Atelier 25 opens tonight and runs through March 31.  I want to thank Meg Birnbaum and Amy Amy Rindskopf for leading the exhibition.  My work is from the “Lost in the Water Project.”

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Herons Along the Blackstone River

It is very hard if you’re out in nature in New England on a routine basis to not develop a fascination with herons. These wonderfully large and patient birds are actually quite easy to photograph. Working stiffs, they only get annoyed with you if you get so close that you screw with their fishing. Can’t say that I blame them. Their markings and scars give each bird a distinctive purpose. For whatever reason, it has been a great year for heron along the Blackstone River. I thought I share a few environmental and reflective portraits as the season wanes.

hunt_160620_1120624-edit-editBlackstone River Heritage Park, Upton, Massachusetts

hunt_160815_1020843-edit-edithunt_160831_1130459-edit-edithunt_160831_1130468-edit-editBlackstone Valley Bicycle Path, Millbury, Massachusetts

hunt_160814_dsc4192-edithunt_160814_dsc4216-edit-editWoonsocket Falls, Woonsocket, Rhode Island

hunt_160831_1130586-edit-editBlackstone Valley Bicycle Path, Millbury, Massachusetts

Contemplating the Water

Last week I posted a series of images of the water flow at the South Natick Dam, along the Charles in Natick, Massachusetts.  Using long exposure techniques I’ve enjoyed studying the way the water flows around its various obstructions.  My interest in the water, and enjoyment of being at the water is hardly new or unique of course.  The flow of water has been providing sustenance and soothing to humanity for as long as we’ve been here (though it doesn’t seem to help us much in weeks like this one).  Focus on water is of course also not unique to humans.  I was reminded of this recently while continuing to photograph here.

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Of course this fellow does it for a living.  Note that these are long exposures.  But he’s not moving. Those who photograph wildlife routinely will generally confirm that wild animals never actually stand still.  They may be quite, but not still.  He’s staring at the water and continued to do so for a good 20 minutes.  He then changed positions and continued his focused attention.  A young couple nearby struck up a conversation and reminded me that he’s doing that because he has to.  We listen to the water because we like it.  How did it all start?  We’ll see this fellow again soon.

Technical note:  These images were shot on film, TMAX 100 and Pan F 50.  Both are wonderful films, still available.  There is very  little grain visible except under a magnifying glass.  I sometimes shoot with film just to make me think about things in a more contemplative fashion.  I found it most helpful here.