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Posts tagged ‘Massachusetts’

The Storm in the Forest

We had a fairly nasty winter storm covering much of New England yesterday.  Inland, it was just another snow storm.  On the coast, the seas sadly became a lethal hazard.  My home is blessed with a back yard that faces conservation land just twenty feet or so from our back windows.  Until the snow covered the windows, we could see into the forest and experience the storm in a way that was very intimate.  I don’t do well with enforced staying at home, but the forest offered some considerable solace.

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You have to admire the ability of nature to withstand it’s own barrage.  Were we all so resilient.

Technical Note:  These images were made with 6K photo on a Panasonic GH5.  It is perfect for capturing action like this.  You hold the shutter down for several seconds capturing thirty 18 mp. jpgs.  You can review the individual images in capture and save those that may have appeal.  It’s a fascinating strategy that I suspect has a great deal of utility for a variety of situations, particularly family and sports.

 

Lost in the Water Exhibition at the Art and Frame Emporium

Lost in the Water #1, 2016

I want to thank my friends at the Art and Frame Emporium in Westborough, Massachusetts for hosting a small exhibition of my series, “Lost in the Water” through November 8.  You’ll also be able to check out a very affordable folio of images from the show.  If you need direction, hit the link above.

Winter Solstice – Griffin Museum of Photography

On display in the Winter Solstice Exhibition at the Griffin Museum of Photography, Winchester, Massachusetts, from December 8 through January 1.

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Blackstone Canal, Uxbridge, Massachusetts – 2016.

“When Autumn Leaves”

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“I miss you most of all.”  Sad times.

(Lyrics by Joseph Kosmo)

The Pull of History

One of my favorite books of all time was Time and Again, by the great Jack Finney.  The book tells the story of a young man who with a bit of assistance from the government (clandestine of course) was able to engage in time travel.  No equipment required though.  All he had to do was make himself open to the experience.  Time passes but it doesn’t really pass.  It is still there if we know how to relate to it.  The book’s star was residing, at the request of his coconspirators, at Manhattan’s famous Dakota building.   After quite some time trying to figure out how to be open to the experience, and many false starts, he simply woke up one morning, went outside and it was the later 19th century.  He had taken up the past’s invitation to visit.

It  reminded me of what I try to see when visiting a place with the past.  I do wish I could visit it for real (of course, I’m sure I would have no idea how to cope but what fun is it to think about that). Sometimes you can find a door or at least a window to the past, an object, an artifact, a story, a book.  Walking along what was once the Blackstone Canal ins Uxbridge, MA it’s easy to hear history’s rumblings.  In the Blackstone Heritage Corridor Park you’re walking along the towpath after all.  A team of mules pulled the canal boats along the journey from Worcester to Providence.  If it’s quiet, it is easy to ponder what it was like when the towpath was actually in use, in the early 1800’s.  For me, one of the windows into that state of reverie are the intense reflections that can be seen there on a calm day..  They are intense enough to be disorienting and I offer you a small collection here.  I resisted the temptation to turn them upside down.  You’re welcome.

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