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Posts tagged ‘South Natick’

Upcoming Publication: Black and White Magazine

I’m grateful to be able to announce a soon to be published portfolio in Black and White Magazine.  My work “Lost in the Water” was chosen for a portfolio merit award and will be published this summer.  For those who don’t know how such things work, in a portfolio competition, you submit one or more portfolios of as many images as the publication requests, grouped around a particular theme.  The interesting question for me has to do with what the editors actually end up choosing to publish.  It is almost never would I expect, reminding me once again just how subjective art really is.  But no matter, as I said, I’m grateful.  Here is my selection of a four favorites from the submission.

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These are from a location that has become very special to me, the South Natick, Massachusetts Dam along the Charles River.  I was able to work there even though I was pretty ill at the time.  The River helped me a great deal and I’m also very grateful for that assistance as well.

If you want to see what the editors chose, you can find their take in Black and White Magazine (the U.S. publication), Issue 177, August 2017.  Alas, photography magazines can be hard to find but Barnes and Noble is probably a good bet.

Work on Exhibit at the Griffin Museum of Photography

I’m again participating in the Atelier Exhibition at the Griffin Museum of Photography.

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Atelier 25 opens tonight and runs through March 31.  I want to thank Meg Birnbaum and Amy Amy Rindskopf for leading the exhibition.  My work is from the “Lost in the Water Project.”

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“When Autumn Leaves”

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“I miss you most of all.”  Sad times.

(Lyrics by Joseph Kosmo)

The Structure of Currents – New Work

I’ve been striving diligently to simplify my images.  I can speculate as to my motivation for doing so, maybe it has something to do with how messy the world is these days.  I also have a tremendous fondness for the work of folks such as Michael Kenna.  (If you’re serious about photography or art, please hit the link.  You will not regret it.)  More pragmatically though, this effort requires reducing the number of elements included within the frame.  Turns out this is not as easy as it might sound.  Life around us is filled with complexity.  It is in fact messy.  So, much like creating sculpture, you have to keep taking things out.  Unfortunately, unlike when working with sculpture, you can’t just pop out a tree.  OK, you could with photoshop if the tree is positioned just right and if you’re really good at doing that type of work.  The result though still frequently looks as though the image is missing something that was popped out in photoshop. Alternatively,I find that I have to think about a potential image in a new way.

Recently I’ve been spending time at the South Natick Dam along the Charles River in eastern Massachusetts.  I find it very restful there.  It is also a wonderful place to photograph.  On one side of the River you can even sit in the shade while photographing the River in bright, hot sunlight. It’s almost too easy.

But it is not a simple place to photograph.  Again, there is a great deal going on.  So, as Bill Neil says, you have to edit out reality, often by using a telephoto lens.  I once had an exchange with Bill in which I asked him how he might go about managing some issues in a wide angle shot.  His answer:  “I’d never take a shot like that.  Too messy.”

I’ve posted many pictures of flowing water here including in my most recent post. Typically, I want to give the viewer a sense of place by providing the context for the water’s flow.  What if you ignore the need for a sense of place, and just explore the water?  What you find are structures in the water’s flow.  Every photographer who photographs water knows this of course.  You can see structure if you shoot at around 1/4 of a second to maybe two seconds.  After that, the water just glows, which has a beauty in itself.  I’ve become interested in the structures that emerge with just a bit of a slow shutter.  What do they reveal?  I’ll let you be the judge.

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A Holiday Gift

It’s been a challenging year, largely health wise.  I’m very glad it’s passing for the most part, though many good things have happened.  You realize who you can count on when times are tough and I’m blessed with some folks who were there for me.  My, wife, daughter and son-in-law are at the top of the list, along with a crucially important poodle, a couple of very good doctors and some friends.  Things are looking up so perhaps more productivity will be visible very shortly.  To all who have faced tough times, and there are so many in our world, I hope your 2016 offers some hope.

I must confess, then that in spite of their efforts to assist me, I hate going to the doctor.  It’s not the doctor, it’s going for the visit.  This is my problem, not their problem, but I hate it regardless.  I don’t know what the issue is, but it has always been with me even though I grew up around doctors.    Yesterday, we had the last visit for 2015 (but, ah, it ain’t over yet…..I know, I know, I’m knocking on wood as fast as I can!).  I was relieved, to say the least.  We’re heading home and looking for a creative thing to do for lunch.  Of course, it is spring time in New England (I know, I’m really tempting fate here for the second time in the same blog posting.  I’m sure I will be sorry I said that in a few days or weeks at most).  The temperature is unseasonably warm.  We decided to stop off at the South Natick Dam, a very contemplative spot along the Charles River in the town of Natick, Massachusetts.  Got a couple of chicken caesar wraps and went to sit on one of the benches along the river.  It was very dark and still cool, but getting warmer.  Actually, the air was becoming warmer than the very still water.  The show began.

Fog started to come drift down the river, which was so still it offered perfect reflections.  Always have a camera with you, and I don’t mean an iPhone.  I’ll let the images tell the rest of the story.

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A nice Christmas gift, the left us almost as quickly as it arrived.  Happy Holidays to you and yours.